Online Dating Leads To Higher Marriage Satisfaction, Lower Divorce Rates: Study

New research suggests that one in three Americans now meet their spouses online, and that those marriages are more satisfying and less likely to end in divorce than those that begin in traditional, offline venues. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and funded by eHarmony , examined the marital status and satisfaction of 19, people who tied the knot between and Of the nearly 20, respondents, 35 percent met their spouses online. Within that group, nearly half met through online dating sites, “whose number of users has increased dramatically just over the past decade,” according to the research. Others reported meeting their spouses through social media, chat rooms, and e-mail, among other online venues. And while the research found that nearly 8 percent of marriages initiated offline ended in breakups, couples who met online reported lower rates of separation and divorce — 6 percent. The authors point to previous research that indicates that people may be more honest when interacting online to explain the findings. Also, the pool of prospective partners is likely larger online, and those on online dating sites may be more focused on finding a long-term mate. The study notes that the majority of Americans do still meet their spouses offline, though some venues are associated with more satisfying marriages than others. Those who met in school, at social gatherings or places of worship or grew up together reported greater marital satisfaction than those who met at a bar, work, or on a blind date.

Dating Apps Are Making Marriages Stronger

What is this page? This paper presents a statistical framework for harnessing online activity data to better understand how people make decisions. Building on insights from cognitive science and decision theory, we develop a discrete choice model that allows for exploratory behavior and multiple stages of decision making, with different rules enacted at each stage. Critically, the approach can identify if and when people invoke noncompensatory screeners that eliminate large swaths of alternatives from detailed consideration.

The model is estimated using deidentified activity data on 1. We find that mate seekers enact screeners “deal breakers” that encode acceptability cutoffs.

More than one third of U.S. marriages begin with online dating, and those couples in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The internet has become a place where you can locate anything. Cute cat pictures, a recipe, or a new husband or wife can all be found online. Many people have turned to online dating to help them romantically. According to market researcher Nielsen, almost 30 million unique users visit dating sites each month, which makes up almost 10 percent of the U. Online dating has caused a noticeable difference in how people view relationships, marriage, and divorce.

However, the increase in online dating has caused a jump in dating between what essentially amounts to strangers. The people who meet on these dating sites are usually not people who have ever encountered one another before and have no other known connections. They were completely unknown strangers before meeting online, which is significantly different than how relationships formed previously. Some studies have found that people who marry someone they meet online experience marital satisfaction at higher rates than couples who meet through other means.

A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal found that of nearly 20, people surveyed who met online and married, only 7 percent were either currently separated or divorced. It could also be because people signing up for dating sites may be more ready to get married than the average person. Even though some studies suggest online dating generally leads to increased quality of relationships and marriages, sometimes divorce is unavoidable, no matter how you met.

How Does Online Dating Affect Relationships?

Applied Cyberpsychology pp Cite as. The influence of technology in our lives has seeped into nearly every aspect of how we relate to others. We connect with our friends and family through text, email, social networking sites SNS , and instant messaging to name but a few. Through a variety of online platforms we seek old and new friends, business partnerships and collaborations, employers and employees and of course, we seek candidates for those relationships most dear to us, romantic relationships.

Another study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal found that marriages formed online were likely to have a higher​.

The largest number of marriages surveyed who met via online dating met on eHarmony This will change a whole generation and countless other generations to follow. Santa Monica, Calif. Its service presents users with compatible matches based on key dimensions of personality that are scientifically proven to predict highly successful long-term relationships. New peer-reviewed research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences PNAS ranks eHarmony as number one for producing the most marriages and the most satisfied marriages.

Of all meeting places measured, eHarmony also had the lowest divorce rate. Cacioppo, Stephanie Cacioppo, Gian C. Gonzaga, Elizabeth L. Ogburn, and Tyler J. VanderWeele Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and off-line meeting venues.

Online Dating is Becoming the Norm

Love at first swipe, apparently, can result in stronger marriages. Recent studies show that dating apps can lead to more fulfilling marriages in comparison to relationships formed offline. With the popularity of dating services like Match , Tinder , Bumble and Hinge , as well as marriage counseling apps like Lasting , online tools are changing the way couples cultivate long-term relationships.

Matching algorithms are a central feature of online dating, yet little research exists on Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,

So who am I to cast doubt on the trustworthiness of dating sites? Worse, the lawsuit says, when users complained or tried to get their money back, Match would deny it did anything wrong. I reached out to Match but no one got back to me. The company posted a response to the lawsuit on its site disputing the allegations. So I reached out to dating coaches who could bring me up to speed on the potential pitfalls of cyber courting. Like other coaches I spoke with, he said success in online dating hinges on having a profile that has a certain je ne sais quoi capable of attracting total strangers.

Amie Leadingham, a Los Angeles dating coach, said 1 out of 6 people meet their future spouse on dating sites. Leadingham said online daters need to develop the skills necessary not just to woo others but also to keep undesirables at bay. Also, watch out for anyone who tries to keep the relationship on the phone or who asks for lots of information.

Try to meet in person as quickly as possible. And now, if the FTC is correct, you need to be suspicious as well of your interactions with the dating site itself. And then, insult to injury, the site would go out of its way to make it difficult for people to cancel their accounts, the lawsuit says. Get our free business newsletter for insights and tips for getting by.

Should I Try Online Dating?

To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today. Not creepy anymore. A survey of married Americans finds that one third met online and that their marriages do just as well as the marriages of the rest. Millions of people first met their spouses through online dating. But how have those marriages fared compared with those of people who met in more traditional venues such as bars or parties?

Pretty well, according to a new study.

based on data from the National Academy of Sciences. “We found that online dating corresponds with way more interracial marriages.

Allison Khadoo , Staff Writer. Sitting in the comfort of her living room, her face changed as she read messages from her matches. Rostran, 21, has been using dating apps such as Tinder since she started college. She met people she could see herself with forever; she met people she liked initially, but in time found boring; and she received multiple instant messages that opened by complimenting her appearance. She is not the only one; young people everywhere consider these exchanges modern day dating.

Online dating has taken over. Walk onto any college campus and ask a number of students about dating apps such as Tinder or Hinge, and they will immediately know them.

One-third of married couples in U.S. meet online: study

Marriage Today covers current trends and research pertaining to marriage and family life in today’s world. Related Topics: Dating , Research. A couple whose wedding I attended this spring met via an online dating site.

published in in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the “relationship quality” of partners who meet online.

Through family? A bar or party? Nowadays, a long-term relationship is likely to start with a simple swipe to the right. From the end of World War II to , most couples met through friends. But that changed in the s with the popularity of the Internet. There are also couples who meet through online communities, online games, chat rooms, social media, social networking sites, etc. But the dating site and apps are responsible for the rapid uptick in couples meeting online.

Those in midlife more often have everyday lives that connect them to few viable romantic options, so online dating is more likely to be where they find love.

Online Dating Really Can Lead to Love

Online dating apps, like Tinder and Bumble, have been accused of killing romance and fueling hook-up culture, but this might be a misconception. Attitudes surrounding marriage have also evolved, which could be one of the reasons for lower divorce rates. There used to be a stigma attached to telling people you and your spouse met online.

Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and offline meeting venues. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, (25), –​

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: Significance We show in this paper that meeting online has displaced friends as the main way heterosexual couples in the United States meet. Traditional ways of meeting partners through family, in church, in the neighborhood have all been declining since World War II. Meeting through friends has been in decline since roughly We present data from a nationally representative survey of American adults.

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